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May eTECHreport - Welcome!

Common Sense Fitting Garnering Kudos from Clubmakers
The first copies of Tom Wishon’s highly anticipated new book on fitting began shipping on April 27 and within a week, the positive comments on the content of the book began to roll in. [continues below]

TWGT On the Nationwide Tour
In an effort to "test the waters", obtain feedback on our designs and expose some of the best "up and coming" players in the country to the performance of TWGT design engineering, TWGT has recently hired and trained a representative who will work for TWGT over the majority of the 2006 season on the Nationwide Tour. Especially interesting is the dual role that TWGT’s tour rep will be playing in his work. [continues below]

The Fitting Importance of Angle of Attack
Over the past several years, a lot more clubmakers and golfers too are becoming aware of the need for driver loft to be matched to the golfer’s swing speed to be able to maximize driving distance. But choosing the best driver loft for maximum distance is not simply a matter of "more loft for slower swing speeds." Determining the correct loft to maximize distance for all golfers requires that you factor in the golfer’s swing angle of attack with their swing speed to come up with the best driver fit.
[continues below]

TWGT Design Profile – 785HF Hybrid Irons
TWGT is pleased to tell you that we have begun to fill all back orders for the new 785HF Hybrid Irons. If you’ve been patiently waiting, it’s very likely by the time you receive this May edition of the TWGT E-TECH report, you’ll also be receiving your order for our latest, high performance hybrid iron design. As one clubmaker put it, "the 785’s are like the 321Li hybrids but on steroids!" [continues below]

TWGT Garners Full Page Article in Golfweek Magazine
Golfweek magazine senior editor Jim Achenbach has called Tom Wishon "the smartest man in golf equipment," and "the Sherlock Holmes of golf equipment" in previous writings. In the April 29 issue of Golfweek, Achenbach devoted the full page of his weekly ‘For Your Game’ section to Tom Wishon in a story titled, "Spreading the Length/Loft Gospel."
[continues below]

Do You "Get It" ?
A couple of times a day, our national accounts manager Matt Mohi will stroll into my workshop office to either keep me updated on matters of the business, fill me in on some feedback from his conversations with custom clubmakers or just plain debate and discuss technical points in fitting or golf club performance. When Matt stops in and tells me that he has opened up a new clubmaker account, I have this little phrase I sometimes ask Matt when we talk about the new account that is telling me about.
[continues below]

A History of Club Design Technology and its Effect on the Game
As so many of you know, I am very frustrated with the rule making philosophy of the USGA concerning golf clubs over the past ten years. Don’t get me wrong. The USGA is a fantastic organization that does a huge amount for the game and I applaud their efforts in all of the many areas in which they contribute to golf.
[continues below]

The International Network of Golf has announced The Search for the Perfect Golf Club is the winner of their 2005-2006 Book of the Year.

The ING Book Media Award rewards excellence in authoring a book based upon any aspect of golf. Entries are judged on a variety of criteria such as content and originality, style, readability, mechanics, technical quality, composition and production values.

The International Network of Golf (ING) is a media-based, non-profit association formed in 1990 to enhance and promote communication and education in the golf industry.

When asked to comment on the award, TWGT founder and Search book author Tom Wishon said, “We’re a lot more than thrilled that ING chose the Search book as their Book of the Year. Since the book was released, we knew that we had created something that truly was a win-win situation both for golfers and for custom clubmaking. Golfers finally have a source for truthful answers to their questions about golf clubs, and custom clubmakers finally have a vehicle which conveys to golfers that their game will benefit much more from going through a real custom fitting session with a skilled custom clubmaker than to simply buy standard made clubs off the rack.”

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Common Sense Fitting Garnering Kudos from Clubmakers

The first copies of Tom Wishon’s highly anticipated new book on fitting began shipping on April 27 and within a week, the positive comments on the content of the book began to roll in.


"Just got my copy of ‘Common Sense Clubfitting’.

Having read ‘The Modern Guide to Shaft Fitting’ and ‘Practical Clubfitting’, I was expecting something special, but I was wrong; it’s even better than that.

It’s certainly worth many, many times more than the regular TWGT catalogue price. I’ll hazard a guess that it, too, will become a much sought-after classic." Richard Kempton


"My copy of Common Sense Clubfitting showed up today. Was it worth the wait? If the rest of it is anything like the first chapter - absolutely!! I’ve found myself laughing out loud on several occasions so far - an aspect that is extremely welcomed whenever reading anything technical.

Not surprisingly, it looks like you’ve knocked it out of the park, Tom. Great job.

PS - Thanks for the autograph!" Jake, Teton Custom Golf, Premium Custom Built Clubs


If you’re interested in learning more about custom fitting to increase the success of your fitting sessions with golfers, Common Sense Clubfitting: The Wishon Method is a must to add to your study materials. The book is written in a very understandable manner and goes into a depth of detail in its common sense explanation of all possible aspects of custom fitting.

Of particular interest to clubmakers who are looking for more confidence in performing a fitting session will be Chapter 2. In this chapter Tom guides clubmakers through an actual fitting session with every aspect written in spoken dialog form. You can read the exact conversation with an example golfer as Tom conducts a full set fitting from start to finish. Another high point of the book is the very in depth explanation of all aspects of wedge and putter fitting, areas in fitting ignored by many clubmakers today. In addition, the discussion of how to identify the movements in the golf swing that indicate specific fitting decisions is information never seen before in this much detail and clarity of understanding.

Order your copy today and you’ll learn why TWGT is without question, the leading name in clubfitting research and information. And you’ll be a better clubfitter in the process as well! #130-FITTING

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TWGT On the Nationwide Tour

In an effort to "test the waters", obtain feedback on our designs and expose some of the best "up and coming" players in the country to the performance of TWGT design engineering, TWGT has recently hired and trained a representative who will work for TWGT over the majority of the 2006 season on the Nationwide Tour. Especially interesting is the dual role that TWGT’s tour rep will be playing in his work.

Brendan Vahey, a former varsity golf team member and recent graduate of Ft. Lewis College in TWGT’s headquarters city of Durango, Colorado, began a career caddying full time on the Nationwide Tour this year, alternating his caddying duties between veteran tour players Trevor Dodds and Jay Delsing. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of each event week, when he’s not toting the bag for Jay or Trevor’s practice or pro-am rounds, you’ll see Brendan working the practice areas, introducing the future PGA Tour players to some of Tom Wishon’s tour player caliber designs.

We’ll let Tom tell you in his own words how TWGT’s appearance on the Nationwide Tour came about.

"To be honest with you, I hadn’t planned or budgeted to hire a rep to work on any of the tours this year," Tom said. I had known Brendan for a couple of years when he was a member of the local college golf team. When I found out he had a real desire to become a professional tour caddy and had hooked up with Jay and Trevor, I had the thought that Brendan could use a few more "guaranteed income" in his first year on tour, and we could possibly see what some of the up and coming tour players think of our designs. I really feel Brendan has what it takes to be able to represent us on tour. He is extremely passionate about the game, is very professional and polite, and for a young man he has a very strong sense of self-confidence which is an absolute requirement of someone who intends to work in the incredibly competitive arena of tour player endorsement and use of golf equipment."

Brendan first underwent extensive one on one training with Tom in early April so that he could "talk the talk" with the Nationwide Tour pros. Then TWGT was able to arrange the proper credentials to enable Brendan to gain access to the practice areas and talk to the pros about TWGT designs. The models being presented to the Nationwide Tour pros in 2006 are the 515GRT fairway woods, the 785 long iron hybrids, and the CLF-1 and 2 putters. As an additional way to "impress" the Nationwide players with TWGT’s design ability, Brenden will also have a couple of the remaining sets of the 550C Limited Edition irons to show and let the players hit.

While Brendan is still learning the ropes in his dual role, he has broken the ice and has three players who have started to use a 515 fairway wood and 785 hybrid in competition. Clubmakers and golfers need to realize that the world of professional tour equipment representation is an extremely competitive environment that is very much fueled by endorsement contract dollars and perpetuated by very aggressive personalities among the major companies’ full time tour reps. TWGT’s goal is not to sign any players to endorsement contracts at this stage in our company’s life – we’re still a very small company with limited marketing resources and thus unable to pay players to use our designs. Our goal is to get a club here or there in play, obtain feedback from some of the better ball strikers in the game about the performance of our models and begin to make some of the up and coming tour players aware of who TWGT is and how good we are at what we do.

We wish Brendan all the success in the world in his desire to make a full time living on the tour and we will be updating you with reports on his and our progress on the Nationwide Tour. If you live in or near a city that hosts a 2006 Nationwide Tour event, look for Brendan wearing a TWGT shirt and hat and say hello!

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The Fitting Importance of Angle of Attack

Over the past several years, a lot more clubmakers and golfers too are becoming aware of the need for driver loft to be matched to the golfer’s swing speed to be able to maximize driving distance. But choosing the best driver loft for maximum distance is not simply a matter of "more loft for slower swing speeds." Determining the correct loft to maximize distance for all golfers requires that you factor in the golfer’s swing angle of attack with their swing speed to come up with the best driver fit.

The Angle of Attack is angle at which the clubhead is traveling with respect to the ground when impact occurs. In general terms the driver head can meet the ball traveling on an upward, level or downward angle of attack. The more upward the golfer’s angle of attack, the lower the loft would need to be to combine with the golfer’s swing speed to achieve maximum distance. Conversely, the more downward the golfer’s angle of attack into the ball, the higher the driver loft has to be when combined with their swing speed to optimize distance.

How do you know the angle of attack for any golfer? You can’t unless you have some means to first be able to measure the golfer’s launch angle and compare that to the loft of the clubhead. Does that mean you need to invest money in an electronic launch monitor to determine the angle of attack? While a launch monitor is definitely a worthwhile piece of equipment for all serious clubmakers to own and use, launch angle can be accurately measured with a hitting net and TWGT’s Launch Angle Mat for a whole lot less cash.

In fitting the right driver loft for golfers, you can get the information you need to determine the golfer’s angle of attack accurately enough to ensure a good fit by simply subtracting the loft of the driver used in the launch angle test from the launch angle reading to obtain the combination of the angle of attack and the shaft’s contribution to the launch angle. Thus if the loft of the driver used in the test is 11° and the average launch angle with the club is 14°, you can safely consider the combination of the angle of attack and the shaft’s contribution to the launch angle to be 3 degrees Upward. If the loft of the driver used in the test were to be 13° and the average launch angle is 12°, the combined angle of attack and shaft bending contribution will be 1 degree Downward.

Remember, you need to know the loft of the driver at the point of impact for the launch angle test because of the effect vertical roll radius on the face has on the loft at any point up and down the face where impact may occur. If you know the driver used in the launch angle test is 11° and the face has a normal roll radius of 10-12", you can safely know if the impact is 1/2" above the center of the face, the loft at the point of impact will be 12°. So remember, for close enough accuracy in your driver loft fitting, you can subtract the loft of the head at the point of impact from the launch angle to get the angle of attack information you need.

Now, what do you do with that to end up finding the best driver loft that will maximize distance for any golfer? Seriously clubmakers, you really should have and use TWGT’s Trajectory and Ball Flight modeling software. For an amazingly powerful and informative piece of shot prediction software such as this to only cost $89.50 is literally a steal, considering all it can do for your fitting. With the TWGT Launch Angle Mat, Trajectory and Ball Flight software and a driver of known loft, clubmakers can very accurately fit any golfer for THE loft angle which will result in the most distance.

How? Meaning, how do you actually do that when you do have these elements of accurate driver loft fitting? Pages 90-94 in the new Common Sense Clubfitting book describes the process in complete step by step procedure. See! One more compelling reason to add TWGT’s new fitting book to your library!

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TWGT Design Profile – 785HF Hybrid Irons

The letters ‘HF’ in the model name stand for Hot Face, which is precisely the primary design difference between the new 785’s and the 321Li hybrid ironheads. One of the design elements that allowed us to be the first company to develop the 515GRT fairway woods with a COR of 0.830 is the special high strength Carpenter Steel alloy forged to make the 515 faces. We chose the same alloy for use in the face of the 785HF hybrids to be able to do the same thing for the 785 designs – to increase the COR of each head to deliver a higher ball speed for any swing speed and increase the distance of the shot.

While the 785’s can certainly stand as a high performance long iron replacement, another unique feature of the 785HF hybrid irons is their optional full iron set design. We’ve designed the 785’s to include all irons through the short irons and PW for golfers who are looking for more distance and a higher ball flight in all of their irons. As a full iron set design, the 785’s are especially good for golfers who sweep through the ball as well as any golfer who hits down and through the ball and take a normal size divot from the turf. They are not a good fit for golfers with a severe downward angle of attack who tear up massive divots with any iron they hit.

Another key performance element in the design of the 785 hybrid irons comes from the shaft design. The #2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 irons are each designed to accept any of TWGT’s 0.335” tip diameter iron shaft designs – GI-335 Light Weight, GI-335 Tour Weight, Series 5 Steel 335 – for a very solid feel and a high flying trajectory. The #7, 8, 9, and PW heads are designed to accept any 0.370” iron shaft because the lofts of the short hybrids take care of all trajectory needs.

For matching with the GI-335 Light Weight graphite shafts in the 785HF #2-6 irons, we recommend the ZT Series 0.370” tip graphite iron shafts for the #7-PW irons. For matching with the GI-335 Tour Weight graphite shafts in the 785HF longer irons, we recommend the Series 5 Steel iron shafts or the InterFlexx Mid/Low graphite iron shafts. And of course if the Series 5 steel 335 shafts are used in the 785 longer irons, the Series 5 steel iron shafts with their 0.370” tip will be the perfect match in the 785 short irons.

In the past two weeks since TWGT’s Nationwide Tour rep has been at work, the 785HF #2 and 3 irons have drawn very positive reviews from the tour players who have hit them and at present, two players on the Nationwide Tour are using them in competition.

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TWGT Garners Full Page Article in Golfweek Magazine

 

Golfweek magazine senior editor Jim Achenbach has called Tom Wishon “the smartest man in golf equipment,” and “the Sherlock Holmes of golf equipment” in previous writings. In the April 29 issue of Golfweek, Achenbach devoted the full page of his weekly ‘For Your Game’ section to Tom Wishon in a story titled, “Spreading the Length/Loft Gospel.”

While the theme of “shorter length and more loft for most golfers’ drivers” is well known to experienced clubmakers, in the article, Achenbach chose to focus on this very important aspect of driver fitting that continues to be unknown to millions of golfers.

We recommend that all clubmakers who wish to have more visible publicity close at hand to verify the experience and image of Wishon Golf to their customers take the time to print a copy of the Golfweek article.

Click here for a printable copy of Achenbach’s article on Tom Wishon is below.

 

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Do You “Get It” ?

A couple of times a day, our national accounts manager Matt Mohi will stroll into my workshop office to either keep me updated on matters of the business, fill me in on some feedback from his conversations with custom clubmakers or just plain debate and discuss technical points in fitting or golf club performance. When Matt stops in and tells me that he has opened up a new clubmaker account, I have this little phrase I sometimes ask Matt when we talk about the new account that is telling me about.

“Does he ‘get it’”?

To me, a clubmaker who “gets it” is a person who fully understands that what they are selling or offering to their golfers is the superiority of a real custom fitting process over simply selling a club or clubs. The beauty of what others call “the component industry”, but what I prefer to term as “the custom clubmaking industry” is that any golfer can be truly fit into clubheads, shafts, grips and assembly specifications which deliver the best set of clubs with which he has ever played.

Unfortunately, 20+ years of many companies in our side of the business selling knock-offs, clones, or otherwise poorly made components has given our side of the golf equipment industry a black eye to a lot of consumer golfers. Many golfers simply look at clubs which are made from components as cheap clubs which cannot possibly be as good as the brand name clubs sold off the rack in pro shops, off course retail stores or over the internet.

Let me tell you one of the most fascinating things I have observed since the book, The Search for the Perfect Swing, was released. Before the Search book came out to spread the gospel of quality custom fitting, it was always the other way around. Clubmakers would have to sometimes talk until they were blue in the face to convince a golfer that what they were going to build would be as good as the brand name clubs.

The reason for this turnaround in credibility in golfers sent by the Search book to be fit is plain and simple; the facts of how fitting is better than buying standard made clubs off the rack are so compelling to the average golfer that they don’t question the components being used in the fitting. Search makes golfers “get it” so their quest is all about the fit.

When a golfer reads Search and proceeds to find the clubmaker in his area to book a fitting, the golfer never questions whether the components being used to build their custom fit set are as good as the brand names.

So here’s a little cheap advice (and I always say ‘cheap’ when I offer advice because the supply is greater than the demand!). If you want to increase your business in clubmaking, talk only about the fitting process and how that will always be better for the golfer than simply picking clubs that are made to some national standard and sold in a “one size fits all” manner by all of the retail golf outlets. If the golfer happens to question the quality of the components, sure, fire out the facts you know that support their quality, but as quickly as possible, shift the conversation back to what you offer that no retail golf store, pro shop or internet golf site can beat you at – your ability to custom fit every golfer with clubs that will accent the individual differences in each golfer.

And of course, there is no better way for you to ensure that your golfers “get it” than to hand them a copy of the Search book, or give them a copy of the 12 Myths That Can Wreck Your Golf Game booklet.

 

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A History of Club Design Technology and its Effect on the Game

As so many of you know, I am very frustrated with the rule making philosophy of the USGA concerning golf clubs over the past ten years. Don’t get me wrong. The USGA is a fantastic organization that does a huge amount for the game and I applaud their efforts in all of the many areas in which they contribute to golf. But the past ten years of equipment rule making edicts have been utterly frustrating to me as a serious golfer and serious golf equipment designer because the organization is not operating with any sense of consistency, and most definitely seems to be making their judgments on the basis of hearsay, emotion and misinformation rather using science and the clear lessons of the past.

When questioned in various articles about their motivation to establish limits on COR, head size, club length and most recently on the moment of inertia of driver heads, the USGA always defends their rule making actions with the statement, “we must make sure technology does not replace skill in the game.”

Something hit me last month after a fellow passionate golfer posed the question, “haven’t there been a lot of technical advances in equipment over the years which replaced golfer skill with technology which were allowed, and which proved to be no harm to the game?” Being an avid reader and sponge for the history of this great game, that question switched on a light bulb of clarity and reason in my head. Once I started to think back on the evolution of golf equipment over the past 100+ years, I could list several equipment breakthroughs which not only were more significant in their effect on shot performance than COR, head size, club length and head MOI, but which were allowed to exist and resulted in more enjoyment for golfers with no harm whatsoever to the game.

1. Dimples on Golf Balls

From the late 1400s to the 1860’s, while the material and construction of golf balls went through changes from wood to the ‘featherie’ to gutta-percha, all balls were made with a smooth surface. Some clever caddies starting in the 1860s began to notice that gutty balls which became nicked on the surface displayed a more consistent flight when hit. As a result, the sharp caddy looking for a nice tip from his player would sharpen the tang of his belt buckle and intentionally carve cross-hatched grooves on the surface of his player’s balls! Once done, the balls flew far longer and far more consistently because the grooved surface pattern allowed the ball to fly with aerodynamic properties.

Soon after, ball makers began to mold all sorts of different patterns on the surface of the gutta percha balls they made. The result on the flight of the ball was nothing short of remarkable, and without question was an example of technology replacing skill in the game. From that time no ball has been made without some type of dimple pattern. By the way, if you want to know how hard the game was before dimples appeared on balls, go find a very old range ball with dimples that have been worn down and try to hit it with your driver.

2. Wound Center Golf Balls

In 1898, Coburn Haskell, an engineer employed by BF Goodrich in Ohio, unveiled the first golf ball made with a rubber core, wound with a continuous rubber strand. The rubber core ball immediately delivered at least 25% more distance over its solid predecessor, the one-piece, hard gutta percha golf ball.

When the rubber core ball began to gain recognition, this created what was perhaps the game’s first major equipment controversy. Traditionalists threw up their hands in protest, claiming the game would be forever ruined. Golfers who were thrilled with the immediate and huge increase in distance were just as adamant about wanting to use the new balls, and by 1904 the rubber core ball had taken over the game, both in major competition as well as in recreational play.

Yes, the introduction of the rubber core ball did mean that the typical 5800 yard long courses built during the gutta percha era no longer could pose the desired challenge to tournament and professional competitions. In the history of the game, courses have always been designed to suit the manner and style of play at the time they were built. Just like today, when the rubber core ball began to take over, courses with enough land built new tee boxes to lengthen the holes. And all new golf courses built after the introduction of the rubber core ball were designed with the longer distance of the new ball in mind. The game went on and suffered no harm from what has to be the single most significant example of technology replacing skill in the game.

“If the ‘bounding billie’ with its rubber core is not banned, the game shall be irreparably harmed.”

Golf Illustrated, UK 1902

3. When Steel Replaced Hickory

From the late 1400s to the early 20th century, the shaft for every golf club was hand-cut and shaped from a hardwood tree. By the mid-1800’s, clubmakers relied on hickory for their shaft making because it possessed the “right whip”. At their best, hickory shafts provided the golfer with a nice feel when the ball was struck solidly. At their worst, hickory shafts would warp from exposure to the elements and were difficult to control because of their 20-30 degrees of torque!

While the first experiments in making shafts from steel began in the 1890’s, steel shafts did not begin to present themselves as a viable replacement for hickory until the 1920’s, when the company that eventually became True Temper developed a more efficient and accurate means to form shafts from steel strip material.

The effect of steel replacing hickory from the early 1930’s as the only shaft in the game was more than remarkable. No longer having to contend with the very high torque of hickory, golfers immediately enjoyed a significant improvement in the accuracy of their shots. Soon after, the swing itself evolved from a flippy, cup-wristed sweep of the club through the ball to the modern power swing of today. Thus not only did steel shafts automatically improve accuracy for all golfers, they opened the door to a swing style that allowed clubhead speed to be increased for more distance.

Technology replacing skill? You betcha, and big time, but again, despite some initial cries from dissenters who feared harm would come to the game from such an instant improvement in accuracy, nothing of the sort ever happened. The game rolled on in its evolution just fine.

4. Perimeter Weighting Offers More Distance on Mis Hits

Whether it was the 1960s when heel and toe weighted putter heads first appeared, the 1970s when deep cavity back irons made their debut, or the early 1980s when hollow, steel woodheads took the game by storm, perimeter weighting in clubhead design presented a remarkable improvement in off-center hit results for all golfers over the blade and wooden head clubheads which preceded these equipment advances.

While the first experiments in making shafts from steel began in the 1890’s, steel shafts did not begin to present themselves as a viable replacement for hickory until the 1920’s, when the company that eventually became True Temper developed a more efficient and accurate means to form shafts from steel strip material.

While there are still many golfers who prefer to play a muscleback style iron or a few who still putt with a pure blade, no one can argue that their off-center hits are not instantaneously better when hit with a clubhead designed with good perimeter weighting as opposed to a blade. Here again, technology in the form of an immediate increase in the moment of inertia in the clubhead did indeed replace the skill of hitting the ball consistently on the sweet spot and no harm can be said to have come to the game.

5. The Instant Swing Speed Increase from Graphite Shafts

Despite the fact that graphite shafts first began to appear in the game in the 1960s, it was not until shaft makers learned to control the torque of their composite shafts in the 1980s that graphite began to exert its real influence of technology replacing skill in the game. Today, industry statistics say that over 90% of all drivers, more than 70% of all fairway woods and some 30% of all irons are sold with graphite shafts.

Here’s another interesting statistic. The majority of golfers who change from a 120 gram steel shaft to a 60-65 gram graphite shaft can experience an automatic increase of 3 to 4 mph because of the drop in the total weight of the club. Same swing, more swing speed from la big drop in shaft weight. For most golfers with the driver, a 1mph increase in swing speed means 2.8 more yards in carry distance for the same loft and quality of impact. Hence a 3-4mph increase in swing speed means that a golfer can achieve as much as a 11.2 yard increase in distance with the driver simply by changing from a heavy steel to a light graphite shaft.

For a golfer with a 100mph swing speed to achieve the same 11.2 yard increase in distance from the COR of a driver compared to the old steel metal woods of the early 1990s, the COR limit would have to be 0.870! No one protested the advent of graphite shafts and what their distance increase could do to harm the game. Yet today, we have to live with a COR limit of 0.830, a distance improvement which is not quite half of what the USGA allowed when graphite shafts came into the game!

6. What Happens Next?

Dimples on golf balls, the rubber core golf ball, steel shafts, perimeter weighted clubheads and graphite shafts are all valid examples of new technology that was allowed to come into the game which replaced the skill required to hit a quality shot. Not only that but dimples, the rubber core, ball, steel and graphite shafts each brought about far more of an improvement in distance (not to mention accuracy and on-center hit ability) than a higher COR, large head, greater length and higher clubhead MOI can offer.

Recently, the USGA ruled that range finders were legal for tournament play. The response has been a split between many state golf associations who are outlawing the use of these distance reading devices, and the USGA, because officials within several of these state associations do not agree with the USGA’s ruling.

Earlier this year, the Ohio Golf Association announced the implementation of a uniform ball rule for their 2006 state competitions. Why? Because some officials in the OGA refused to believe the USGA’s opinion that some modern ball designs did not offer an advantage in shot making to players with higher swing speeds.

Such actions of disagreement among regional associations and the USGA are certainly not good for golf. Unfortunately, they are the result of an inconsistent administration of the rules of this great game by the USGA. Technology replacing skill is supposedly why we in the US and Mexico live with the COR, head size, club length and now driver head MOI limits recently imposed by the USGA. Yet range finders, dimples, different ball core designs, steel shafts, perimeter weighting, graphite shafts and fitting specification changes such as woodhead face angle and clubhead weight distribution are allowed even though they are far more of an example of technology replacing skill than COR, size, length and MOI.

I love this game. I mean I really love this game. And I for one would hate to see any harm come to golf that would result in both decreased participation and enjoyment. If you care about the game, I think it’s time for you to write a letter to the USGA and ask them to consider the inconsistency of their recent equipment rulings about range finders, COR, head size, club length and head MOI in light of what the history of this game has taught us.

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All eTECHreport (ISSN 1551-1103) articles written by Tom Wishon unless otherwise noted. Please refrain from unauthorized reproduction of text, photos, and/or graphics.